Mendocino Land Trust

Working with you to conserve the land
while there's still time...

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  • Seaside Beach

  • Hare Creek Beach

  • Navarro Point

  • Big River

  • Stornetta

  • Caspar Beach

  • Caspar Uplands Trail

Our Saved Lands

We believe that being in natural settings is restorative and essential, which is why we invite you to explore the lands that Mendocino Land Trust, with your help, has saved and preserved for future generations.

 

Trail Finder

The Mendocino Coast is dramatic, rugged and intimate. There is so much to explore here, and Mendocino Land Trust is dedicated to protecting lands for all to enjoy. We have developed a popular web-based coastal trail app to provide maps, photos and useful information to help you find your next Mendocino Coast adventure. 

 

State Parklands Conserved in Partnership with Mendocino Land Trust

Mendocino Land Trust, with terrific community support, has protected several coastal lands from logging or development and placed them in the trust of California State Parks.

 

Big River Estuary

Led by the Mendocino Land Trust, a group of 20 conservation groups, 12 state and federal agencies, 17 private foundations, more than 70 local businesses and 1,400 individual donors from 25 states and Canada raised $25.7 million to purchase the property, thereby preserving it from further commercial logging use and opening it to restoration.  It is now a beautiful California State Park that is an essential contributor to our community’s soul and its economic life.  Projects to restore fish habitat and old-growth forest conditions are underway.  Further, the estuary is part of the recent initiative by the Land Trust and stakeholder partners to extend conservation and restoration to the entire Big River watershed.

Click here for more information on our trail app.


Caspar Beach and Uplands

For decades, Caspar Beach has provided local residents and visitors a great opportunity for surfing, beach walking, birding and picnicking. And, for what has likely been centuries, the Caspar Beach property has contained the southernmost stand of Sitka spruce in California and habitat for nesting ospreys and purple martins. The Land Trust partnered with the State Coastal Conservancy in 1998 to acquire and manage Caspar Beach until the property was ultimately conveyed to State Parks in 2012. The lot includes a public trail which can be found on our trails web-app. 

Click here for more information on our trail app.


Caspar Headlands

This is the headlands property to the north of Caspar Beach. In partnership with the Caspar community and the national Trust for Public Land, funding was secured from the Coastal Conservancy for the property's acquisition in 2000. Mendocino Land Trust held and managed the property until it was transferred to State Parks in 2002. Protection of Caspar Headlands, together with the adjacent Caspar Beach, resulted in the protection of Caspar Creek, which is an important habitat for Coho salmon, steelhead trout, osprey and shorebirds. 

Click here for more information on our trail app.


Glass Beach

Fort Bragg's leaders closed the city dump in 1967, and many of our longtime members recall that Mendocino Land Trust helped make the site into a park. With strong community support, Mendocino Land Trust put together an agreement with the landowner to conserve the property, protecting it from potential development and working for over four years alongside the State Coastal Conservancy to assemble the funding to make this beach a state park. We are proud to have managed the waste removal and cleanup of the site plus the botanical, cultural and erosion studies needed prior to purchase by California State Parks.  

Click here for more information on our trail app.


Heider Field

The potential development of Heider Field was the catalyst in forming the Mendocino Land Trust in 1976.  John Heider, the owner of the lot, was interested in building his School for Human Potential, but local residents rejected the idea.  Heider was looking to sell the lot, so a group got together and created the Land Trust to potentially purchase the land.  The Land Trust was instrumental in a land swap that resulted in Heider Field being conveyed to State Parks.  The protection of this field is an important example of the protection of a piece of land valued by the community.

 

Lands we own for Your Enjoyment

The Land Trust owns and manages several lands for public enjoyment.  We need your help to continue to care for these properties, so please consider joining us on one of our stewardship days.

 

Seaside Beach

Beautiful, sandy and very popular Seaside Beach is located 10 miles north of Fort Bragg on the Mendocino Coast. It’s owned and managed by the Mendocino Land Trust. This expansive pocket beach is much loved by locals and visitors to the area.

Click here for more information on our trail app.


Hare Creek Beach

Hare Creek Beach is a very sweet pocket beach owned and managed by Mendocino Land Trust, located at the south end of the City of Fort Bragg. This beach can be accessed from Bay View Drive, Mendocino College, or the intersection of Highways 1 and 20. There is a stairway from the south side that is buffeted by high winter tides and is currently in disrepair, though it was rebuilt in 2015.

Click here for more information on our trail app.


Pelican Bluffs

On December 6, 2013, Mendocino Land Trust (MLT) purchased a beautiful 75-acre property, “Pelican Bluffs,” south of Point Arena from the California Institute of Environmental Studies. The State Coastal Conservancy funded this purchase, which will offer opportunities to protect endangered species habitat and to construct a new segment of the California Coastal Trail. We are very excited about this acquisition, and look forward to stewarding the land’s unique ecology and to building a new public trail.

This property offers habitat for two federally-listed endangered species, the Point Arena Mountain Beaver and the Behren’s Silverspot Butterfly. In addition, MLT plans to collaborate with Moat Creek Managing Agency to design, build and steward a new 2-mile segment of California Coastal Trail on this land and on adjoining public access easements.

Click here for more information on our trail app.


Navarro Point

Navarro Point

This 56-acre preserve, with its stunning wildflowers and a 1.2-mile coastal trail, is managed by the Mendocino Land Trust. Navarro Point offers spectacular views of the central Mendocino Coast. There are rare plants in many locations on this property. Know that the bluffs are very steep, so for your safety, please stay on the trail. There is parking here, but no restrooms or trash receptacles. We ask that you pack out everything you pack in.

Click here for more information on our trail app.


 

Other Places we helped protect

Point Arena-Stornetta Unit of the California Coastal National Monument

The Point Arena-Stornetta Public Lands have been called one of the most significant parts of the Mendocino coastline.  The addition of 1,664 acres to the California Coastal National Monument at Point Arena-Stornetta in 2014 was a rare and historic triumph for Mendocino County, and the first time the Coastal National Monument boundaries expanded onto land.  Mendocino Land Trust was honored to play a leadership role with a huge team of federal, state and local officials and many local and national community organizations in the final effort to get the monument designated by President Obama.  It was a true people’s project, where the voice of community members was heard in the White House.
All publicly owned lands within the Point Arena-Stornetta Public Lands boundary are open to the public for daytime activities, including hiking, fishing, bird-watching, nature photography and wildlife watching.  The area is home to several endangered species, intact native plant communities, unique geological features and recreational amenities.   

Click here for more information on our trail app.


Westport Headlands

In 1998, the Westport Village Society asked Mendocino Land Trust to assist in the protection of the eight-acre Westport headlands. The property, which was approved for subdivision into six lots, had been historically used for community events and in many ways defined the villagers' sense of place. Over a two-year period, the Westport Village Society, the Coastal Conservancy and Mendocino Land Trust secured the funding to purchase the land. The property is now owned by the Westport Village Society, which is managing the property for the public. 

Explore and celebrate the land with us...